‘Do you really believe that God expects you to show Him your respect by repeated bowing and kneeling and prostration? Might it not be better only to look into oneself and to pray to Him in the stillness of one’s heart? Why all these movements of your body?’
As soon as I had uttered these words I felt remorse, for I had not intended to injure the old man’s religious feelings. But the hajji did not appear in the least offended. He smiled with his toothless mouth and replied:
‘How else then should we worship God? Did He not create both, soul and body, together? And this being so, should man not pray with his body as well as with his soul? Listen, I will tell you why we Muslims pray as we pray. We turn toward the Kaaba, God’s holy temple in Mecca, knowing that the faces of all Muslims, wherever they may be, are turned to it in prayer, and that we are like one body, with Him as the centre of our thoughts. First we stand upright and recite from the Holy Koran, remembering that it is His Word, given to man that he may be upright and steadfast in life. Then we say, “God is the Greatest,” reminding ourselves that no one deserves to be worshipped but Him; and bow down deep because we honour Him above all, and praise His power and glory. Thereafter we prostrate ourselves on our foreheads because we feel that we are but dust and nothingness before Him, and that He is our Creator and Sustainer on high. Then we lift our faces from the ground and remain sitting, praying that He forgives our sins and bestow His grace upon us, and guide us aright, and give us health and sustenance. Then we again prostrate ourselves on the ground and touch the dust with our foreheads before the might and the glory of the One. After that, we remain sitting and pray that He bless the Prophet Muhammad who brought His message to us, just as He blessed the earlier Prophets; and that He bless us as well, and all those who follow the right guidance; and we ask Him to give us of the good of this world and of the good of the world to come. In the end we turn our heads to the right and to the left, saying, “Peace and the grace of God be upon you” - and thus greet all who are righteous, wherever they may be.
‘It was thus that our Prophet used to pray and taught his followers to pray for all times, so that they might willingly surrender themselves to God - which is what Islam means - and so be at peace with Him and with their own destiny.’

— An extract from ‘The Road to Mecca’ by Muhammad Asad  (via everfleeting)

(via everfleeting)

Sorrow prepares you for joy. It violently sweeps everything out of your house, so that new joy can find space to enter. It shakes the yellow leaves from the bough of your heart, so that fresh, green leaves can grow in their place. It pulls up the rotten roots, so that new roots hidden beneath have room to grow. Whatever sorrow shakes from your heart, far better things will take their place.

Rumi 

There are some feelings you will never find words for; you will learn to name them after the ones who gave them to you.

Maza Dohta (via everfleeting)

(via everfleeting)

On the pursuit of
perfection, we often
pick apart what makes
us unique, overlooking
the beauty of each trait.
But let me tell you this:

no one ever admired
a rose for the mere
symmetry of its petals.

If you go on the path of shukr (thankfulness), sabr (patience) will be made easy.

Shaykh Abdal Hakim Murad (via heartheraindrops—fall)

(via skysailing-mu)

السلام

ibtasem:

When I found my way
to Him
the thunderstorm in my soul
suddenly abated

and a garden
of inner calm started
to grow inside of me.

Verily, He is As-Salman
The Source of Peace.

(via muqmanii)

A good deed dies, when it is spoken about.

Arabic Proverb (via muslimahbyheart)

(via skysailing-mu)

(via skysailing-mu)

everfleeting:

Sunne wale bohat hain, samajhne wala koi nahi.

This is why it hurts the way it hurts.

You have too many words in your head. There are too many ways to describe the way you feel. You will never have the luxury of a dull ache.

You must suffer through the intricacy of feeling too much.

Iain S. Thomas, I Wrote This For You (via abluesforbrklyn)

(via skysailing-mu)